Choose The Best Sensor For You

Besides Reliability, which sensor type is best for you depends on four things:

Sensor-Type Details | Measuring Sensor Performance

Optical

Inexpensive optical sensors are an excellent choice if you'll never use clear labels or go too fast.

The LionEye2 is an example of an optical sensor.


Strength

Inexpensive

Weakness

Clear Labels, Speed

Scores

Performance: 3/5
Materials: 2/5
Ease of Use: 4/5
Cost: 5/5
Reliability: 5/5

 

Differential Capacitive

If you use clear labels, but never use metallic materials, metallic inks, or other metallic artwork, these are the best sensors on the market.

The LRD2100 is an example of a differential capacitive sensor.

Strength

Clear labels, Speed

Weakness

Metallic materials and inks

Scores

Performance: 5/5
Materials: 3/5
Ease of Use: 4/5
Cost: 4/5
Reliability: 5/5

Single-Ended Capacitive

These sensors work well with metallic inks, hot-stamps and other metallic artwork. They can be difficult to adjust for solid metallic label materials like foils.

The LRD6300 is an example of a single-ended capacitive sensor.

Strength

Clear labels, Metallic art, Speed

Weakness

Solid foil label materials

Scores

Performance: 5/5
Materials: 4/5
Ease of Use: 5/5
Cost: 4/5
Reliability: 5/5

Ultrasonic

Unaffected by metal, these sensors work on nearly everything and are easily adjusted. They are the least accurate, and accuracy goes down as speed goes up.

The LRD8200 is an example of an ultrasonic sensor.

Strength

Works on virtually all materials

Weakness

Accuracy, Layered webs, Speed

Scores

Performance: 2/5
Materials: 5/5
Ease of Use: 5/5
Cost: 3/5
Reliability: 5/5

 

 

 

 

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